YPP Network Description

The MacArthur Research Network on Youth and Participatory Politics (YPP) formed out of recognition that youth are critical to the future of democracy and that the digital age is introducing technological changes that are impacting how youth develop into informed, engaged, and effective actors.

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BYP MEMO: The Political Impact of Young People of Color in the 2012 Election

November 9, 2012 - 10:51am

Today, the Black Youth Project releases its latest memo: The Political Impact of Young People of Color in the 2012 Election.”

This new analysis shows that youth again increased their presence at the voting booth, and this increase was driven largely by high levels of turnout among young Blacks and Latinos.

Young people of color played an especially important role in President Obama’s re-election. Young Blacks and Latinos supported Obama at rates similar to 2008, while support for Obama among white youth dropped by ten percentage points.

In sum, focusing on youth as one voting bloc obscures these important differences across racial groups. Any valuable discussion of young voters must be attuned to these patterns.

Because of the increased percentages of young people of color in the population and in the voting electorate, these populations have played an increasingly important role in selecting the nation’s president, and will continue to do so.

“The Political Impact of Young People of Color in the 2012 Election” is the eighth in a series entitled Democracy Remixed: Black Youth and the Future of American Politics released by the Black Youth Project.

Click here for the full analysis

Categories: Blog

BYP MEMO: The Impact of New Photo Identification Requirements on Young People of Color

September 10, 2012 - 9:00pm

Today the Black Youth Project releases its latest memo, “Turning Back the Clock on Voting Rights: The Impact of New Photo Identification Requirements on Young People of Color.”

The new analysis finds that young people of color possess photo IDs at lower rates than whites. Therefore, they will be disproportionately demobilized by the recent spate of photo ID laws.

Our estimates indicate that turnout amongst youth of color will be reduced significantly in states where such laws have been passed, and the consequences will be of particular importance in battleground states like Florida and Pennsylvania.

Extensive voter mobilization and education efforts will be crucial to ensure high levels of turnout amongst young people in November.

The Impact of New Photo Identification Requirements on Young People of Color” is the seventh in a series entitled Democracy Remixed: Black Youth and the Future of American Politics released by the Black Youth Project.

Click Here for the Full Analysis

Categories: Blog

BYP MEMO: Race, Youth, and the Gender Gap

July 17, 2012 - 8:50am

Today, the Black Youth Project releases a brand new memo; “Race, Youth, and the Gender Gap.”

The new analysis shows that there is a considerable gender gap in political behavior amongst Black youth. Young Black women turn out to vote at higher rates than young Black men, and hold more liberal views on political matters.

Heading into the 2012 election, The Obama campaign and other mobilization groups must re-engage young Black women to sustain their high level of political participation. For young Black men, increased mobilization efforts must be combined with an effective messaging strategy that can help convince them that President Obama is committed to working for their interests over the next four years.

Increasing the turnout of young Black men would not only reduce the gender gap, but it could be an effective way to help secure the re-election of President Obama.

Race, Youth, and the Gender Gap” is the sixth in a series entitled Democracy Remixed: Black Youth and the Future of American Politics released by the Black Youth Project.

Click Here for the full analysis

Categories: Blog

REPORT: Participatory Politics – New Media and Youth Political Action

June 26, 2012 - 8:01am

According to a new report, Black Youth engage in participatory politics online at rates equal to or slightly higher than white, Latino, and Asian-American Youth.

The MacArthur Research Network on Youth and Participatory Politics (YPP), under the direction of co-principal investigators Cathy J. Cohen of the University of Chicago and Joseph Kahne of Mills College, today unveiled the findings of the largest nationally representative study to date of new media and politics among young people.

The national survey questioned 3,000 young people, ages 15-25 on how they use the Internet, social media and engage in politics. Unlike any prior study on the topic, the YPP survey included large numbers of black, Latino, and Asian American respondents, allowing for unique statistical comparisons across race. The data present one of the most complete pictures to date of how young people are using new media in new ways to engage politically, providing relevant insights on both the long-term political picture in America and the upcoming 2012 election.

The study report, Participatory Politics: New Media and Youth Political Action shows that contrary to the traditional notion of a technological digital divide, substantial numbers of young people across racial and ethic groups are engaging in “participatory politics” — acts such as starting a political group online, circulating a blog about a political issue, or forwarding political videos to friends.  Like traditional political acts, these acts address issues of public concern. The difference is that participatory acts are interactive, peer-based, and do not defer to elites or formal institutions. They are also tied to digital or new media platforms that facilitate and amplify young people’s actions.

Check out the full report and an executive summary below!

Participatory Politics: New Media and Youth Political Action

Executive Summary

Full Report

Categories: Blog

BYP MEMO: “President Obama and the Politics of Change”

June 14, 2012 - 9:17am

Today, the Black Youth Project releases a brand new memo; “President Obama and the Politics of Change.”

The new analysis shows that Black youth believe that significant changes have occurred during the Obama administration, but continue to believe that big change is needed in America. During this time they have also become increasingly skeptical about whether electoral politics can effectively bring about the needed changes.

Black youth were responsive to the rhetoric of change in the 2008 election, but since then seem to have become more skeptical of whether politicians and political institutions can effectively deliver the change they believe is necessary.

It will be the task of campaign and community organizations to find ways to both mobilize young people to vote while also engaging them in helping to effect change from the ground up.

President Obama and the Politics of Change” is the fourth in a series entitled Democracy Remixed: Black Youth and the Future of American Politics released by the Black Youth Project.

Check out the full analysis here

Categories: Blog

BYP MEMO ‘Youth, Race, and Partisanship’: In 2012 No Party Can Take Young Voters for Granted

May 2, 2012 - 11:57am

The Black Youth Project’s latest memo examines partisanship in youth voting patterns as we approach the 2012 elections.

Analysis shows that while young voters are often believed to be overwhelmingly Democratic, partisanship and vote choice vary considerably across racial groups. These patterns have significant implications for how campaign and community organizations mobilize support and turnout among young voters in upcoming elections.

The study casts doubt on the idea that all youth consistently support the Democratic Party. Youth are not a consistent voting bloc per se, with race, education, income, and gender all serving as important sources of variation in youth voting patterns.

The memo, entitled “Youth, Race, and Partisanship,” is the fourth in a series entitled Democracy Remixed: Black Youth and the Future of American Politics released by the Black Youth Project.

Click here for the memo

Categories: Blog

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